My Last Hope Wrapped In a Spring Roll

Hello, hello! Recently a dear friend reached out to me, updating me on her latest endeavor, which I had been curious about since Left Coast Apothecary’s IG profile popped up. Intriguing name, isn’t it? “Left Coast Apothecary creates uniquely “left coast” style health, beauty and wellness enhancing functional foods, herbs and teas made with only the highest quality certified Organic and non-GMO sourced ingredients.” I had the pleasure of trying their Dandelion + Trikatu Chai Warming Tea and Dandelion + Maca & Vanilla Bean Morning Brew.  Both have dandelion which is a potent detoxifier, and delivers a high amount of vitamins and trace minerals.

The Left Coast Philosophy

Our formulations are inspired by the core healing traditions of ancient Greece & Egypt, Chinese herbalism, Ayurvedic medicine and the modern alternative health movement. All products are hand-crafted with Love and warm intentions. 

Our ultimate goal is to help our community cultivate their highest level of health and happiness. To that end, we donate a percentage of our proceeds to the Weingart Foundation, a private, non-profit organization providing help, nourishment and opportunity to the homeless of Los Angeles and nearby cities.”

One late afternoon after an intense exercise class (much needed glucose replenishment), I came home with the chills… the perfect time to make a cup of the Warming Tea. Upon opening the bag I was delighted to see the wonderful array of whole ingredients + the spicy aroma that met my nose. For those of you who know me, I like to explore all of my senses (especially when it comes to food). I added some milk and sugar to my brewed cup, and enjoyed every last body-warming sip. A neat infobite to note about the Trikatu blend:

“Widely used in Ayurvedic medicine, Trikatu is a simple mixture of three pungent spices which stoke the 

“digestive fire” within the body necessary for the breakdown of food and absorption of nutrients.”

Now for the Morning Brew… a nice way to wake the body up, more gently than caffeine–wonderful if you’re sensitive. I let it steep for too long, and the dandelion (or was it the mac) was potent–so make note, be present. I was interested in seeing how my body would respond to this blend of “wake me up” ingredients, and I quite like the idea of energizing my body with wholesome nutrients. It makes sense. I added some coconut oil and maple syrup for an added metabolism boost, but on its own it offers a robust “wake up” call.

I appreciate the Ayurvedic wisdoms on how our unique bodies operate, especially noting that our bodies change throughout the day, not just milestones. Connecting and tuning in. I’ve incorporated Ayurvedic practices into my own life through healing journeys and my day to day. They’ve also helped me take an approach where I meet myself where I’m at. Left Coast Apothecary incorporates these wisdoms beautifully, and the quality is apparent!

Thank you so much Alexandra for sharing your amazing blends with me, and I’m so looking forward to seeing how your company grows! Go check out Left Coast Apothecary, and see what they have in store for you.

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In other news…

I posted my lunch the other day on Instagram, and by popular demand I have the recipe ready for you! I’ve been trying to break out of a dietary rut/reviving my culinary practice… little by little. To be honest, I have been eating practically the same thing day in, day out for the past couple months it seems… it’s one less thing to put my thought towards. But at the same time, I feel the enjoyment of my daily life… the inspiration… dwindling.

I suspect it’s related to things in my life feeling like they’re suspended in air, and I am just waiting for them to come down. Almost like I am waiting to finally stretch out and live!

Anywho, enough of my rambling, but here is what happens when I try to nourish myself by grasping on to my inspiration from the night prior: rice wraps.

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Fresh Vegetable Springs Rolls
Making spring rolls is a meditative practice for me + it usually ends up as something delicious. I cooked the veggies and egg beforehand so they cooled down.. then took the rice papers, and prepared them with patience and water.
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1720 calories
348 g
372 g
13 g
46 g
4 g
909 g
436 g
21 g
0 g
7 g
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size
909g
Amount Per Serving
Calories 1720
Calories from Fat 118
% Daily Value *
Total Fat 13g
21%
Saturated Fat 4g
19%
Trans Fat 0g
Polyunsaturated Fat 3g
Monounsaturated Fat 4g
Cholesterol 372mg
124%
Sodium 436mg
18%
Total Carbohydrates 348g
116%
Dietary Fiber 10g
42%
Sugars 21g
Protein 46g
Vitamin A
459%
Vitamin C
48%
Calcium
22%
Iron
44%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your Daily Values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Ingredients
  1. 3 leaves bok choy, chopped
  2. 2 carrots, julienned
  3. 8oz. shiitake mushrooms, sliced
  4. 1 spring onion, finely sliced
  5. Extra virgin coconut or olive oil for cooking
  6. 1/2 tsp Chinese Five Spice
  7. 2 tsp coconut sugar
  8. Sea salt to taste
  9. 2 pasture-raised eggs, beaten
  10. 8 sheets of rice paper
For Serving
  1. Coconut aminos
  2. Thai basil or other complimentary fresh herb like mint
Instructions
  1. Trim the stems from the mushrooms and discard (or save for soup or stock). Cut the caps into slices; set aside.
  2. Hear a large fry pan over medium-high, once heated add the mushrooms (letting them start to sweat out their natural flavorful juices). Then warm 1 1/2 tsp. of the oil. Add bok choy and egg stirring, until cooked but not overly so. Add the spring onions, coconut amino, sugar, and Chinese Five Space and cook until the pan is dry, about 1 minute. Transfer to a bowl, add carrots; set aside to let cool.
  3. Fill a large, shallow bowl with very hot water. I boiled the water in a kettle first, then poured into a bowl and let it get to a workable temperature. Soak the rice-paper wrappers, 1 at a time, until flexible but not too much or they will tear. This is a delicate matter. Shake off any excess water and stack the wrappers on a plate. Place 1 wrapper flat on a work surface. Arrange a combination of the veggies and herbs across the center of the wrapper; fold the ends in over the filling and then roll up tightly from the edge closest to you. Repeat to make the remaining rolls.
Optional
  1. Cut the rolls in half on the diagonal and serve immediately.
Notes
  1. Be sure to have all your ingredients ready and easily accessible when you start to roll, and give yourself plenty of time (and counter space) to make these. Also be sure to have a few extra rice paper wrappers on hand—it may take a few tries before you’re rolling like a pro.
  2. Store the summer rolls in a dish or plastic container that’s roomy enough to hold them without their touching. Place a damp paper towel in the bottom of the container to keep the rolls moist. Cover tightly with plastic wrap.
beta
calories
1720
fat
13g
protein
46g
carbs
348g
more
the kitchen gypsy http://www.thekitchengypsy.online/

What do you do when you find yourself in a rut?

 

 

9 comments

    1. Jim
    2. 2 years ago
    3. Reply

    Kathrina-

    I love your spring roll recipe. It seems that you do not cook them after rolling, right? I would think that deep frying at that point would be an option.

    Jim

      1. Katharina
      2. 2 years ago
      3. Reply

      Jim!! Always good to hear from you 😀

      Yes, frying them would be an option – escaped my mind. Lately I’ve been craving more refreshing things as summertime in Florida is HOT! I wonder if frying them in coconut oil would give them a nice mild flavor note 🙂

      How are things? Try anything new in the culinary world lately?

        1. Jim
        2. 2 years ago
        3. Reply

        Yes, it is good to hear from you, too.

        Your recipe is certainly refreshing as-is!

        I have tried rapeseed oil from Northern Europe lately to see how it compares with its evil deviant, canola, which I avoid like the plague. I use it more for dressing dishes and it is quite delicious. Rapeseed oil tends to be yellow, thick, and flavorful. It is particularly good as a last-minute dressing for cruciferous greens.

        In general, I think that the Northern Europeans are being overrun on the organic and GMO fronts but they don’t know it. I saw on another blog that someone had gotten organic farmed salmon. It turns out that “Organic” is the name of the product and it does not have to be USDA Organic or even organic in the general sense.

        Pumpkinseed oil has become a habit with me, particularly with vanilla bean ice cream…Thanks!

        Jim

          1. Katharina
          2. 2 years ago
          3. Reply

          OHHH!! I’m so glad you’re enjoying the pumpkin seed oil with vanilla bean ice cream (I have a feeling you may enjoy my next post).

          Interesting notion on the EU and their organic and GMO fronts… I think what most people are forgetting with these movements is the disconnection we have with source and process of getting the food we buy in grocery stores.

          Rapeseed.. interesting! I know that they grow it abundantly over in Germany, and it is used as a common ingredient in processed food over there. I tend to stay away from the oils that are produced in incredible abundance ^_^ and also I’ve been researching a bit more about PUFAs and their possible affect on our health. You might find it of interest actually..!

          Anyway, hope you’re having a great week so far!!

            1. Jim
            2. 2 years ago

            Katharina-

            Oh, yes, I am familiar with PUFAs and they are not of much concern with rapeseed oil. I just stumbled on a link to Swedish rapeseed oil that covers it all. I have not tried this particular brand. Here is the link:

            http://www.aak.com/Global/Brochures/Rapeseedoil_from_AAK.pdf

            Canola is something entirely different. It is genetically modified to tolerate Roundup herbicide.

            I have tried about four different brands of European rapeseed oil; one was suspiciously light, like canola, and had been produced in Europe by a branch of a USA (United States of America) company. I contacted the company and got no reply.

            Between that and the “organic farmed salmon” I wonder what is happening in Europe. There is virtually no rapeseed oil produced in the USA or Canada, by the way.

            Jim

    1. Jim
    2. 2 years ago
    3. Reply

    Oops, Katharina. The “a” key on my keyboard is rebelling.

    Jim

    1. Jim
    2. 2 years ago
    3. Reply

    Katharina-

    Oh, yes, I am familiar with PUFAs and they are not of much concern with rapeseed oil. I just stumbled on a link to Swedish rapeseed oil that covers it all. I have not tried this particular brand. Here is the link:

    http://www.aak.com/Global/Brochures/Rapeseedoil_from_AAK.pdf

    Canola is something entirely different. It is genetically modified to tolerate Roundup herbicide.

    I have tried about four different brands of European rapeseed oil; one was suspiciously light, like canola, and had been produced in Europe by a branch of a USA (United States of America) company. I contacted the company and got no reply.

    Between that and the “organic farmed salmon” I wonder what is happening in Europe. There is virtually no rapeseed oil produced in the USA or Canada, by the way.

    Jim

      1. Jim
      2. 2 years ago
      3. Reply

      P.S.

      The issue is clouded because some people consider the terms rapeseed and canola to be interchangeable, some people consider one term to include the other but not vice versa, and some people consider the terms to be mutually exclusive.

      Jim

      1. Katharina
      2. 2 years ago
      3. Reply

      Curious what you mentioned about your thoughts on the industry in Europe… something worth looking into it seems.

      Thanks for the link! I’ve got a tab open to check it out later 😀

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